My Aspirations

Tuesday, April 21, 2015 Ammar Anwar 0 Comments Category :

By
Haider Abbas
1st Year MBBS


I live in a world of numbers, or perhaps, the world appears to me as such. During conversations, I dive into a sea of thoughts and engage my mind into calculations whenever numerical entities get deposited on my pinna. My cones and rods are equally receptive for anything alike. My journey can very well be juxtaposed with the one in which you start walking in a lawn where you discover how numbers live and treat each other. If seen closely, this ecosystem of numbers is managed by four very basic mathematical operations. But as you ascend up to higher trophic levels, complexities increase. Some phyla are real and some seemingly materialized. Numbers, too, have categorization among them. Some are composed and rational. Some are disheveled and have no particular destiny (irrational). Some are not real, but that doesn't mean they are fabricated. It's just that real ones can't grasp them, because complex entities have imaginary connotations associated with them. Thus, they appear alien to the otherwise normally distributed community. Decorated numbers have certain symbols associated with them (pi and e for example). Speaking of the lawn, you will occasionally see a medley of species and if you are lucky enough, you will find the Oscar's butterfly, though the probability is not more than that of having snow in July. My thoughts occasionally follow the Archimedes' spiral until I hear a boom! (not the Sonic Boom, but a reverberation in a field at right angles to my oval window), so pardon me if I'm going tangentially. While taking the A Level Thinking Skills MCQ exam in a time-compressed ambience, I fell short of time and marked 'B' as the answer to the last ten MCQs according to the "Letter Of The Day Theorem". One of my accomplishments include the usage of the binomial distribution to calculate the probability of getting four right answers out of the ten as it served as a palliative for my hypothalamus; securing an "A" in this syllabus is prodigious. The fragrance of Calculus didn't arouse my nasal system until I came across this sentient adage while skimming through my Further Mathematics book: "Change and decay in all around I see". My hippocampus responded well to this arousal. The biochemistry of my limbic system therefore supported me in a discussion with a friend who hypothesized that a hot cup of coffee cools relatively faster in summers. Though he was right with respect to his school of thought, my theoretical approach conquered his pragmatic manner of thinking. What I mean to say is that he was taking in account the effect of wind speed (due to usage of electric fans during summers) on evaporation but was not considering the "less well-known" Newton's law pertaining to thermodynamics (probably because he didn't know of it). I, therefore, concluded that both of us were right, but 'relative' to our own schools of thought. That's General Relativity for you. Teaching serves as a hobby and as a part time job for me. I have taught a myriad of students voluntarily, and two students for a salary. My favorite hobby is to practice frugality in spending time. In this regard though,I must admit, Mr. Micheal, the founder of Vsauce has acted as a paradigm; he continues to inspire me with his revealing videos. Lastly, in order to recapitulate what I have presented above, I need to answer a question which I'm asked recurrently by virtually everyone: What are my future plans? I'll have to use this excerpt in order to answer this question in the abstract at the very least:

"In his Miscellanea analytica (1730), Abraham de Moivre presented further analytical trigonometric results, making use of complex numbers. Although he did not state what is now known as de Moivre's theorem,it is clear that he was making use of it"
I aspire to become the de Moivre of the 21st century.


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